Monthly Archives: April 2011

Remove undefined from a Javascript object

I’ve been doing a fair amount of javascript programming lately, and I found myself needing to remove a nested object from an object.  Doing this is easy enough with the “delete” command, but it leaves you with annoying “undefined”s all over.  To get around that, I scoured the internet for a way to remove them easily.  Turns out that if efficiency isn’t a problem, it’s easier to drop the right objects into an array and then re-assign it.

var tmpArray = new Array();
for(el in self.orderData.data.items) {
     if(self.orderData.data.items[el]) {
          tmpArray.push(self.orderData.data.items[el]);
     }
}
self.orderData.data.items = tmpArray;

Easy and pie.

Caching WordPress Data with the Transients API

If you’re a plugin or theme developer, there may come a time when you need to execute a long running operation. It doesn’t need to be anything complicated, but something as simple as fetching a Twitter feed can take a significant amount of time. When you come across these types of situations, it’s handy to be able to store the data on your own server and then fetch a new copy of it every X hours. This is called caching, and WordPress convieniently comes packages with an excellent caching API called Transients .
Wordpress Transients API

The Transients API is surprisingly simple to use. In fact, it’s very much like using set_option and get_option except with an expiration time. If you aren’t familiar with caching at all, here’s the general workflow:

  1. If the data exists in the cache and isn’t expired, get it.
  2. If the data doesn’t exist in the cache or is expired, perform the necessary actions to get the data.
  3. Store the data in the cache if it doesn’t already exist or is expired.
  4. Continue from here using data.

When attempting to use the Transients API for caching, there are three functions that you need to be aware of: set_transient, get_transient, and delete_transient.

  • set_transient($identifier, $data, $expiration_in_minutes): This function stores your data into the database. The identifier is a string that uniquely identifies your data. Your data can be any sort of complex object, so long as it is serializable. The expiration is how long your want your data to be valid (ex: 12 hours would be 60*60*12).
  • get_transient($identifier): This retrieves your data. If the data doesn’t exist or the expiration time has passed, false is returned. Otherwise, the same data you stored will be returned.
  • delete_transient($identifier): This will delete your data before it’s expiration time. This is handy if you are storing post-dependent data because you can hook it into the save action so that every time you save a post, your cached data is cleared.

Now that we’ve covered the basics, how about a quick example?

if (false === ( $my_data = get_transient('super_expensive_operation_data') ) ) {
     $my_data = do_stuff();
     set_transient('super_expensive_operation_data', $my_data, 60*60*12);
}
 
echo $my_data;
 
function do_stuff() {
     $x = 0;
     for($i = 0; $i != 999999999; $i++) {
          $x = $x * $i;
     }
     return $x;
}

The example is pretty straight forward. We first check to see if there is a cached copy of the data, if not, we fetch the data from the “do_stuff” function, and store it in the database. Simple, right?

One of the benefits of using the Transients API (aside from speeding your site up) is that plugins like WP Super Cache or WP Total Cache will auto-magically cache your data into memcached if you have it set up. For you, this means an even faster site! If you have any questions about caching techniques or the Transients API, leave a comment and I’d be happy to help.