What’s New With Kernl – February 2017

It’s been a little while since my update, so let’s dive right in to what’s new.

  • Kernl now has an enhanced billing area. The mechanism for paying an expired invoice was pretty confusing and it wasn’t possible to see your past invoice amounts. With these changes you can now see the last 10 invoices from Kernl and if you ever need to pay an out-of-date invoice that process is much simpler.
  • Purchase codes can now be limited to a domain. This is handy if you don’t want your customers buying a single license and using it on many sites.
  • Work has started on feature flags! Feature flags are a software development best practice of gating functionality. Functionality can be deployed “off”, then turned on via the feature flag, separate from deployment. With feature flags, you can manage the entire lifecycle of a feature. This is _super_ useful for the WordPress community because it allows you to turn functionality on/off without creating and deploying a new version. You can roll out flags based on a boolean on/off, percentage of users, or just to specific users. If you’d like to be part of the beta, let us know.
  • Kernl’s 3 Node.js app servers were upgraded. They now have 1GB of RAM per server instead of 512MB.

If you have any questions, thoughts, or concerns, feel free to reach out on Twitter or comment here.  Cheers!

What’s New With Kernl – November 2016

It’s been a long time since the last Kernl update blog, so lets get right into it.

Big Features

  • GitLab CI Support – You can now build your plugins and themes automatically on Kernl using GitLab.com!  We’ve had support for GitHub and BitBucket for a long time, and finally figured out a good way to make things work for GitLab.  See the documentation on how to get started.
  • Slack Build Integration – If you are a slack user, you can now tell Kernl where to publish build status messages.
  • Replay Last Webhook – Sometimes when you’re running a CI service with Kernl it would be useful to re-try that last push that Kernl received.  You can now do that on the “Continuous Integration” page.

Minor Features

  • Repository Caching – We now do some minor caching of your git repositories on the Kernl front end.  The first load will still reach out to the different git providers, but subsequent loads during your sessions will read an in-memory cache instead.
  • Better Webhook Log Links – Instead of displaying a UUID, the webhook build log now displays the name of the plugin or theme.

Other

  • Miscellaneous Upgrades – Underlying OS packages and Node.js packages were upgraded.
  • Payment Bug Fixes – There were a few minor bugs that kept showing up if someone’s credit card expired.  This fix hopefully allows for a more self-service approach.
  • Minor copy changes – A few changes were made to the wording on the Kernl landing page.

What’s next?

  • It’s been a few months since Ubuntu 16.04 LTS came out, so I’ll be spending significant amounts of time upgrading our infrastructure to the latest LTS version.
  • If our load balancer goes down right now, everything goes under.  A floating IP address between two load balancers will solve that issue and provide high(er) availability.
  • Better insights into purchase code usage and activity.